jQuery('[href="https://www.google.com/maps/place/LeafSpring+School+at+Sonterra/@29.6152542,-98.4891228,17z/data=!3m1!4b1!4m5!3m4!1s0x865c62012a62c801:0xd52a55d141b59c01!8m2!3d29.6152542!4d-98.4869341!11m2!1m1!1e4"]').click(function(){ gtag('event', 'conversion', {'send_to': 'AW-929906735/-UB9CKaWndoBEK-AtbsD'}); }); });
LeafSpring School at Sonterra

December 7, 2019

STEAM in the PreSchool Classroom

dhemphill

Lately, everyone seems to be talking about STEAM. It’s a hot topic in the world of education and in the business community, but what does STEAM have to do with your preschooler?

What is STEAM?

STEAM stands for science, technology, engineering, art and math. You may think some of these subjects seem lofty for young children to grasp. In some ways, that’s true. Young children may not be ready to understand multiplication or how computers work. But, they can build a strong foundation for future learning by exploring STEAM preschool skills and concepts through play and discussion, then applying those skills through more play.

For young children:

  • Science encourages investigation and answering questions, often involving experimentation.
  • Technology refers to using simple tools like crayons and rulers, as well as more complex ones like microscopes and computers.
  • Engineering refers to recognizing problems and testing solutions.
  • Arts encourage creativity and allow children to illustrate concepts they are learning.
  • Mathematics deals with numbers, but also patterns, shapes, organizational skills and much more.

Why should young children learn STEAM subjects?

They can be learned. Children have the ability to learn foundational concepts at a young age. Preschools and child care providers should nurture STEAM skills and concepts early and build on them through ongoing opportunities for play and discussion.

They’re useful. Skills children learn engaging with STEAM concepts in preschool are transferable across many aspects of their lives. Process skills, such as observation, hypothesizing and critical thinking, are basic skills for math and science but are also valuable skills for learning any subject.

They are in demand. Have you ever thought about what your child’s life might be like in 20 years? In some ways it is hard to imagine what career options children might have as adults. One thing is certain, skills in science, technology, engineering and math will be increasingly important. For early education providers, part of our responsibility to children is preparing them for the realities they’ll face later in life.

What should STEAM look like for young children?

An important part of our approach… is introducing children to the right activities at the right times. We introduce children to new skills and concepts when they are developmentally ready, making learning fun and natural.

Science, technology, engineering, art and math are part of daily life. So it makes sense that children should explore these subjects in an integrated way every day through books, discussions, experiments, art projects, educational games and more. This method is far more effective than limiting instruction of STEAM subjects or any subject to only certain times of the day or week.

Article written by Dr. Gloria Julius